Igbo lady


Love God. Love Locs. Love Nigerian food. Love all things African. Love Pinterest...and other random things

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africaisdonesuffering:

Interview: Jason Njoku
I’m proud to be an African. A huge part of my pride I can attribute to my parents (hailing from Nigerian and Sierra Leone). When I look back, I’m thankful that they forced me to wear African fabrics to school events, constantly blasted music to the likes of Youssou N’Dour or Salif Keita in the living room, and fed me generous heapings of Joloff rice and Grannat stew on a nightly basis.
At the time, I didn’t give being African much thought. As I got older and further away from my parents influence, I started to really embrace the music, movies, and culture of which I came from.
Movies are particularly relevant to me nowadays. I’m an aspiring filmmaker now, but back then, The Gods Must Be Crazy and Shaka Zulu were the only “African” movies I remember barely being able to sit through. After being introduced to the film “Mummy’s Daughter” (I know, I was really late to the game) a few years ago, Nollywood, and African cinema in general, really garnered my adult interests.
The discussion over Nollywood tends to be endless; who does it benefit? Where are the quality scripts and actors? etc. However, in western film, it often appears that not everyone is allowed to have a voice, and I love that in a world that lacks representation of Africans in the media, Nollywood continues to support African stories, actors, and filmmakers.
This past summer, I was searching for some movies to watch, but living in NYC the only way I knew how to get these African films are by buying DVD bootlegs down Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn. After searching for some downloads online, I came across iROKOtv.
iROKOtv is a web platform that provides Nigerian films on-demand. With over 5,000 Nollywood films, it is one of Africa’s first mainstream online streaming websites. Coined “the Netflix of Africa,” I thought it’d be a great idea for Rise Africa to speak to the CEO of iROKOtv, Jason Njoku, and discuss more about Nollywood, iROKOtv and when he fell in love with his roots (read interview)

africaisdonesuffering:

Interview: Jason Njoku

I’m proud to be an African. A huge part of my pride I can attribute to my parents (hailing from Nigerian and Sierra Leone). When I look back, I’m thankful that they forced me to wear African fabrics to school events, constantly blasted music to the likes of Youssou N’Dour or Salif Keita in the living room, and fed me generous heapings of Joloff rice and Grannat stew on a nightly basis.

At the time, I didn’t give being African much thought. As I got older and further away from my parents influence, I started to really embrace the music, movies, and culture of which I came from.

Movies are particularly relevant to me nowadays. I’m an aspiring filmmaker now, but back then, The Gods Must Be Crazy and Shaka Zulu were the only “African” movies I remember barely being able to sit through. After being introduced to the film “Mummy’s Daughter” (I know, I was really late to the game) a few years ago, Nollywood, and African cinema in general, really garnered my adult interests.

The discussion over Nollywood tends to be endless; who does it benefit? Where are the quality scripts and actors? etc. However, in western film, it often appears that not everyone is allowed to have a voice, and I love that in a world that lacks representation of Africans in the media, Nollywood continues to support African stories, actors, and filmmakers.

This past summer, I was searching for some movies to watch, but living in NYC the only way I knew how to get these African films are by buying DVD bootlegs down Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn. After searching for some downloads online, I came across iROKOtv.

iROKOtv is a web platform that provides Nigerian films on-demand. With over 5,000 Nollywood films, it is one of Africa’s first mainstream online streaming websites. Coined “the Netflix of Africa,” I thought it’d be a great idea for Rise Africa to speak to the CEO of iROKOtv, Jason Njoku, and discuss more about Nollywood, iROKOtv and when he fell in love with his roots (read interview)

Source: africaisdonesuffering

tinysorceress:

I think the dangerous thing about the sex-positive movement is twofold: first, because it makes appeasing the male gaze into some sort of feminist act and reinforces the idea that women’s real power is in our sexuality (more specifically, our attractiveness to heterosexual men) and secondly in that it presents that as the only viable option and frames women who don’t want to be seen that way for whatever reason as misguided or repressed

Source: momjeaned

the-exercist:

Reclaiming Fitspo: Mathilde-Amivi Petitjean

Petitjean is a 19 year old cross-country skier. Born in Niger and briefly competing for France, she now represents Togo. Petitjean debuted at Sochi as Togo’s first competitor at the Winter Olympics.

Born to a Togolese mother, Petitjean spent most of her life in  in Haute-SavoieFrance, where she learned to ski. In March 2013, she was actually contacted by the Togolese Ski Federation through Facebook and invited to compete in the Olympics. She had never before considered becoming an Olympian, but ran with the opportunity.

Although she did not place well in her race, Petitjean is not discouraged. She has already begun talking about her training for the 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. She hopes that her appearance will help to inspire other Africans to invest in winter sports and support the Olympic teams. "I think all the people in all (African) countries are happy for me," she stated. "It’s good for African countries that they see it’s possible to participate in the Winter Olympic Games."

ETA: Petitjean’s birthday is Feb. 19th, so click the links on her Sochi profile to give her a celebratory shoutout on twitter or facebook! 

Click here to see all Reclaiming Fitspo profiles. 

Source: the-exercist

obstinate-nocturna:

bemusedlybespectacled:

inkfromtheoctopus:

Addams Family Values (1993)

Gomez knows how its fucking done.

Gomez gives out better relationship advice than like 90% of dudes.

Gomez Addams is a suave motherfucker who loves his wife more than his own life.

Everyone should want a Gomez. He’s p cool.

Why I love the Addams forever

Source: liverde

howiviewafrica:

Lewis Farrakhan responds to “Nigeria” being corrupt. His answer is A MUST SEE!!

passivemanipulations:

Project for my Social Psych class last semester. This poster series was created to 1) challenge these internalized stereotypes by bringing them to the viewer’s attention and 2) expand the range of role models by including a diverse group of women. Each poster follows the same basic pattern: a woman who has demonstrated her competency in a particular area refutes the stereotype that appears above her in the form of “Girls can’t …”. While the posters target girls ranging from children to young adults, I expect the message would also cause people outside that demographic to question their own beliefs about women and power.  I designed each aspect of the posters with several principles of social psychology in mind:

Read More

Source: passivemanipulations

Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink (via fliponymous)

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

(via haveyouevercriedwolf)

White people are still the ~standard so that’s not so revolutionary.

(via dykeprivilege)

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

(via little-bulldozer)

If you take away anything from this website, please let it be what I bolded ^

(via buxombibliophile)

Let’s take it a step further. For every hour a white man works, a black woman has to work 86 minutes to earn as much money. 57.6 hours a week compared to the white man’s 40.

Take it another step further. Assuming a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 job, from Thursday 12:45pm through Friday end of business, a white man gets paid for his work, a black woman is, by comparison, working for free.

(via fuckyeahcracker)

See also: Why intersectionality is REALLY FUCKING IMPORTANT OK.

(via geekygothgirl)

Source: fliponymous

melodiebenford:

Seven Black Female Thought Leaders History Books Ignore

By Kenneshea Allums

Major events like the civil rights movement and women’s movement would not have been possible without the ideas and efforts of Black women.

Maria Stewart (1803-1879) was the first American woman, Black or white, to speak in front of a mixed crowd of men and women. Stewart’s revolutionary claim that women are an integral part to the liberation of Black people was a direct challenge to patriarchy and hegemony and preceded many known Black thinkers such as Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth. Read more about her life and discourse in Marilyn Richardson’s Maria W. Stewart: America’s First Black Woman Political Writer.

Ella Baker (1903-1986) was a radical and an organizer, a behind-the-scenes force who propelled the civil rights movement and a prominent member of the NAACP.

bell hooks (1952-) is a writer, scholar, feminist, social critic and a venerable force leading the Black feminist struggle against racism, sexism, capitalism, patriarchy and imperialism. In Ain’t I A Woman, a work that is a classic in the feminist and Black liberation canon, bell hooks chronicles Black women’s history in America from slavery to the 1970s. hooks has written a number of books exploring the systems of oppression that perpetuate racial inequality and offer transgressive solutions to end these issues. Recently,  hooks joined political commentator Melissa Harris-Perry in conversation at The New School, where hooks is currently a scholar-in-residence.

Angela Davis (1944-) is the embodiment of radical Black female thought, involved with the Communist Party and associated with the Black Panther Party during the 1960s. She is a scholar, activist, author, and two-time Communist Party vice presidential nominee. In Woman, Race, and Class she analyzes events that have shaped Black women’s experiences in America and uses them to illustrate how multiple oppressive forces impacted the women’s life choices and provides one of the earliest critical examinations to the women’s suffrage movement and feminism.

Patricia Hill Collins (1948-) is a sociologist best known for her work “Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness and the Politics of Empowerment,” in which she details how race, class, gender, sexuality and nation intersect to have compounding effects on people with several marginalized identities.

Amy Jacques Garvey (1895-1973) was the force behind Marcus Garvey and a leader in the Pan-African/Black Nationalist Movement. She was a journalist, feminist, and activist, who assumed several important roles within United Negro Improvement Association that was active during the 1920s.

Nikki Giovanni (1943-) is one of the most praised and accomplished poets of her generation. Her body of work tells us what it was like for a strong-willed, militaristic Black nationalist female to come of age during a ’60s revolutionary movement that didn’t make much room for women. Giovanni’s work was an important catalyst for Black women to become actively involved in revolutionary action.

Full Article

Source: atlantablackstar.com

niggawillyoushutthefuckup:

theculturedactivist:

Open your eyes.

New age Genocide 

Source: theculturedactivist

saltysojourn:

Follow this link to find a short clip and analysis that considers intersections of privilege and colonialism.

Source: saltysojourn