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divalocity:

VOGUE JULY 2014: Actress Lupita Nyong’o

Photographed by Mikael Jansson  

Styled by Phyllis Posnick

Source: divalocity

18-15n-77-30w:

paleyontology:

Kelela

18° 15’ N, 77° 30’ W

18-15n-77-30w:

paleyontology:

Kelela

18° 15’ N, 77° 30’ W

Source: paleyontology

Source: custa-tentar

livelaughlovelocs:

Niceee

livelaughlovelocs:

Niceee

Source: thenolyechronicles

veganlocs:

Source: LocsofPoetry  What a beauty

veganlocs:

Source: LocsofPoetry
What a beauty

Source: veganlocs

footprintsofmymoon:

My lens on natural beauty. 

Unedited Shots….

muse : Nicholas @ _letitbeknown

creative director & photographer: Alma Mart. @unfadingroyalty

Source: footprintsofmymoon

accras:

People’s Most Beautiful: Natural beauty Lupita Nyong’o

accras:

People’s Most Beautiful: Natural beauty Lupita Nyong’o

Source: accras

blackhaireverywhere:

crimsong19:

consultingpiskies:

Jessica Williams speaks with Sgt. Jasmine Jacobs about Army regulation AR 670-1

Jessica Williams and Travon (one of the staff writers) do it again!

This is why white women can’t be in the natural hair movement

Source: consultingpiskies

Source: smokingcheeba

africaisdonesuffering:

Interview: Jason Njoku
I’m proud to be an African. A huge part of my pride I can attribute to my parents (hailing from Nigerian and Sierra Leone). When I look back, I’m thankful that they forced me to wear African fabrics to school events, constantly blasted music to the likes of Youssou N’Dour or Salif Keita in the living room, and fed me generous heapings of Joloff rice and Grannat stew on a nightly basis.
At the time, I didn’t give being African much thought. As I got older and further away from my parents influence, I started to really embrace the music, movies, and culture of which I came from.
Movies are particularly relevant to me nowadays. I’m an aspiring filmmaker now, but back then, The Gods Must Be Crazy and Shaka Zulu were the only “African” movies I remember barely being able to sit through. After being introduced to the film “Mummy’s Daughter” (I know, I was really late to the game) a few years ago, Nollywood, and African cinema in general, really garnered my adult interests.
The discussion over Nollywood tends to be endless; who does it benefit? Where are the quality scripts and actors? etc. However, in western film, it often appears that not everyone is allowed to have a voice, and I love that in a world that lacks representation of Africans in the media, Nollywood continues to support African stories, actors, and filmmakers.
This past summer, I was searching for some movies to watch, but living in NYC the only way I knew how to get these African films are by buying DVD bootlegs down Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn. After searching for some downloads online, I came across iROKOtv.
iROKOtv is a web platform that provides Nigerian films on-demand. With over 5,000 Nollywood films, it is one of Africa’s first mainstream online streaming websites. Coined “the Netflix of Africa,” I thought it’d be a great idea for Rise Africa to speak to the CEO of iROKOtv, Jason Njoku, and discuss more about Nollywood, iROKOtv and when he fell in love with his roots (read interview)

africaisdonesuffering:

Interview: Jason Njoku

I’m proud to be an African. A huge part of my pride I can attribute to my parents (hailing from Nigerian and Sierra Leone). When I look back, I’m thankful that they forced me to wear African fabrics to school events, constantly blasted music to the likes of Youssou N’Dour or Salif Keita in the living room, and fed me generous heapings of Joloff rice and Grannat stew on a nightly basis.

At the time, I didn’t give being African much thought. As I got older and further away from my parents influence, I started to really embrace the music, movies, and culture of which I came from.

Movies are particularly relevant to me nowadays. I’m an aspiring filmmaker now, but back then, The Gods Must Be Crazy and Shaka Zulu were the only “African” movies I remember barely being able to sit through. After being introduced to the film “Mummy’s Daughter” (I know, I was really late to the game) a few years ago, Nollywood, and African cinema in general, really garnered my adult interests.

The discussion over Nollywood tends to be endless; who does it benefit? Where are the quality scripts and actors? etc. However, in western film, it often appears that not everyone is allowed to have a voice, and I love that in a world that lacks representation of Africans in the media, Nollywood continues to support African stories, actors, and filmmakers.

This past summer, I was searching for some movies to watch, but living in NYC the only way I knew how to get these African films are by buying DVD bootlegs down Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn. After searching for some downloads online, I came across iROKOtv.

iROKOtv is a web platform that provides Nigerian films on-demand. With over 5,000 Nollywood films, it is one of Africa’s first mainstream online streaming websites. Coined “the Netflix of Africa,” I thought it’d be a great idea for Rise Africa to speak to the CEO of iROKOtv, Jason Njoku, and discuss more about Nollywood, iROKOtv and when he fell in love with his roots (read interview)

Source: africaisdonesuffering